Developmental Charts

We specialize in treating

adults and children alike

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Motor Development Chart

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0-2
Months

Rolls to back from both right and left sides.

Bends and straightens arms (alternately or together).

When held in standing position, bears weight with knees flexed and feet flat.

Lying on back, tracks rattle 90 degrees from mid-line to each side.

Looks at hands for 3 seconds.

Closes fingers in a tight grasp.

3-5
Months

Elevates head and upper trunk 45 degrees, bearing weight on forearms to see toy.

Brings both feet to mouth for play or grabs feet with hands while lying on back.

Rolls from back to left and right sides with opposite arm crossing the mid-line.

Lying on back, extends straight arms toward rattle.

Picks up rattle.

Grasps and holds cube.

6-8
Months

From stomach, elevates head and stomach, bearing weight on palms.

Rolls from back to stomach, leading with hips and thighs, followed by stomach and then shoulders.

Uses arms to move forward 3 feet.

Picks up 2 cubes and retains both.

Sitting, brings hands together to secure block.

Grasps cube with thumb and 1st and 2nd fingers with space visible between cube and palm.

9-11
Months

Creeps 5 feet on hands and knees with opposite arms and legs moving together.

Using stable object for support, raises to standing position.

Frees hand and body from support and maintains balance in standing position 5 seconds.

Claps hands.

Removes both socks.

Grasps cube with pad of thumb and pad of index finger, with hand, wrist and arm off table.

12-14
Months

Uses alternating steps to walk 8 feet holding adult’s hand.

Creeps up 2 steps on hands and knees.

Walks unaided 5 steps.

Opens book.

Makes at least one scribble more than 1 inch long on paper.

Picks up 2 cubes with 1 hand and holds them.

15-18
Months

Walks 10 feet quickly.

Walks backward 5 steps.

Walks up 4 steps with support (may place 1 or both feet on each step).

Stacks 2 to 3 cubes on tops of each other.

Grasps marker with thumb and 1st finger toward paper.

19-24
Months

Runs forward 10 feet.

Walks sideways for 10 feet, leading with same foot.

Jumps forward 4 inches without falling.

Turns 3 pages in book, 1 at a time.

Draws vertical line.

25-30
Months

Jumps and touches line 2 inches above standing reach.

Placing 1 foot on each step, walks up 4 steps (may use wall or rail for support).

Runs 30 feet.

Removes screw on lid from bottle.

Stacks 8 to 10 cubes on top of each other.

31-36
Months

Jumps down from object 18 inches high without assistance.

Walks on tip-toes 8 feet on 4-inch line.

Placing 1 foot on each step, walks up 4 steps without support.

Builds bridge of 3 blocks.

Draws a circle.

37-42
Months

Runs 15 yards in 6 seconds or less.

With hands on hips and without heels touching toes, walks forward 4 feet on 4-inch line.

Runs on balls of feet used to push forward, toes pointed forward, and trunk pointed forward.

Cuts paper into 2 pieces.

Grasps marker with thumb and pad of index finger; upper part of marker rests between thumb and index finger.

43-48
Months

With 1 foot on each step, walks down 4 steps without support from wall or rail.

Jumps forward 6 inches on 1 foot.

Runs and stops without falling.

Buttons and unbuttons 1 button.

49-54
Months

Completes forward roll without turning more than 15 degrees to either side.

Using 2-footed takeoff and landing, jumps forward 36 inches.

Hops on 1 foot 3 feet, changes feet and hops back.

Draws a square.

Touches each finger to thumb.

55-60
Months

Runs 10 feet, picks up a can and returns to the staring line without tripping or dropping the can.

Maintaining balance and rhythm, using opposing arm and leg movement, and using alternating feet, skips 8 feet.

Folds paper in half lengthwise with edges parallel.

Colors between vertical lines.

61-72+
Months

Maintaining balance and rhythm, using opposing arm and leg movement, and using alternating feet,skips 10 feet.

Without losing balance or letting free foot touch the floor, hops 20 feet in 6 seconds.

Fold paper in half twice with edges parallel.

Birth-3
Months

Startles to loud sounds.

Quiets or smiles when spoken to.

Seems to recognizes your voice and quiets if crying.

Increases or decreases sucking behavior in response to sound.

Hearing & Understanding

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Praesent eget ullamcorper enim. Curabitur scelerisque mi dolor, eget egestas sem interdum eget. Etiam eros tortor, malesuada sed velit a, rhoncus congue elit.

Seriously, we do

4-6
Months

Moves eyes in direction of sounds.

Responds to changes in tone of your voice.

Notices toys that make sounds.

Pays attention to music.

7-12
Months

Enjoys games like peek-a-boo and pat-a-cake.

Turns and looks in direction of sounds.

Listens when spoken to.

Recognizes words for common items like “cup,”“shoe,” “juice.”

Begins to respond to requests, “Come here,” “Want more?”

1-2
Years

Points to a few body parts when asked.

Follows simple commands and understands simplerequests (“Roll the ball,” “Kiss the baby,” “Where’syour shoe?”).

Listens to simple stories, songs, and rhymes.

Points to pictures in a book when named.

2-3
Years

Understands differences in meaning (“Go-Stop,” “In-On,” “Big-Little,” “Up-Down”).

Follows two requests in sequence, “Get the book and put it on the table.”

3-4
Years

Hears you when you call from another room.

Hears television or radio at the same loudness level as other family members.

Answers simple “Who, What, Where, Why” questions.

4-5
Years

Pays attention to a short story and answers simple questions about it.

Hears and understands most of what is said at home and in school.

Talking

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Praesent eget ullamcorper enim. Curabitur scelerisque mi dolor, eget egestas sem interdum eget. Etiam eros tortor, malesuada sed velit a, rhoncus congue elit.

Seriously, we do

Birth-3
Months

Makes pleasure sounds (cooing, going).

Cries differently for different needs.

Smiles when sees you.

4-6
Months

Babbling sounds more speech-like with many different sounds, including p, b, and m.

Vocalizes excitement and displeasure.

Makes gurgling sounds when left alone and when playing with you.

1-2
Years

Says more words every month.

Uses some 1-2 word questions (“Where kitty?” “Gobye-bye?” “What’s that?”).

Puts 2 words together (“More cookie,” “No juice,” “Mommy book”).

Uses many different consonant sounds at the beginning of words.

7-12
Months

Babbling has both long and short groups of sounds such as “tata upup bibibibi.”

Uses speech or non-crying sounds to get andkeep attention.

Imitates different speech sounds.

Has 1 or 2 words (bye-bye, dada, mama) although they may not be clear.

2-3
Years

Has a word for almost everything.

Uses 2-3 word sentences to talk about and ask for things.

Speech is understood by familiar listeners most of the time.

Often asks for or directs attention to objects by naming them.

3-4
Years

Talks about activities at school or at friends’ homes.

People outside family usually understand child’s speech.

Uses a lot of sentence that have 4 or more words.

Usually talks easily without repeating syllables or words.

4-5
Years

Voice sounds clear like other children.

Uses sentences that give lots of details (e.g., “I like to read my books”).

Tells stories that stick to topic.

Communicates easily with other children and adults.

Says most sounds correctly except a few like l, s, r, v, z, j, th.

Family members can clearly understand your child’s speech.

Talk Naturally
To Your Child

Talk about what your child is doing and what your child sees. Encourage your child to communicate. Make it fun.

Talking Tips

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Praesent eget ullamcorper enim. Curabitur scelerisque mi dolor, eget egestas sem interdum eget. Etiam eros tortor, malesuada sed velit a, rhoncus congue elit.

Seriously, we do

Take Time
To Listen To Your Child

Respond to what said so your child knows you have been listening. Don’t interrupt or constantly correct your child.

Read
To Your Child Frequently

This is the time children begin to develop early reading and writing skills. Surround your child with language-rich experiences.

Accept Speech Mistakes
As Your Child Develops

Don’t ask your child to slow down or repeat. Listen patiently and focus on what your child is saying rather than how it is said.

Hearing & Understanding Tips

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Praesent eget ullamcorper enim. Curabitur scelerisque mi dolor, eget egestas sem interdum eget. Etiam eros tortor, malesuada sed velit a, rhoncus congue elit.

Seriously, we do

Have Your
Child's Hearing Tested

If you find you have to repeat yourself or have to talk loudly to get your child’s attention.

Seek
Professional Help

From an ASHA -certified audiologist or speech-language pathologist if you’re unsure. Never wait to get help for your child if you suspect a problem. You and your family members know more about your child than anyone.

Early
Identification & Treatment

Of hearing, speech, and language disorders can prevent problems with behavior, learning, reading, and social interactions.